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ICC to Boost Afghan Economy

New office to boost the private sector; attract foreign investment and seek solutions to the problems facing the business community.

The International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) on Thursday inaugurated its new branch in Afghanistan in an attempt to boost the economic development programs in the country.

Speaking at the inauguration ceremony, CEO Abdullah Abdullah said the purpose of the ICC branch office in Afghanistan was not to rival with other institutions in the country. It was instead a move is to boost the private sector; attract foreign investment and seek solutions to the problems currently facing the business community in Afghanistan.

“We are not satisfied with our performance when it comes in providing facilities to the private sector. We should also facilitate processes within the private sector and the private sector should also work with responsibility and expectations we have,” said Abdullah.

ICC officials have pledged to introduce measures to promote the strategic significance of Afghanistan as a main trade corridor in the region and to further the trade and commercial relations between Afghanistan and the world.

“We want to connect Afghan investors and businessmen to the world business community through ICC in order to pave the way for international investments in Afghanistan,” said Mayel Agha Khairkhaw, chairman ICC in Afghanistan.

On the importance of private sector in the national economic development process, the CEO stated that the government has to do more in providing satisfactory services to the private sector.

 Addressing the audience at the inauguration ceremony, Afghan minister of economy Abdul Sattar Murad said there was a dire need for more solid action to combat corruption in Afghanistan. He warned that no strategy or development program would be fruitful unless corruption in the country is tackled.

“Corruption negates any policy, any law and action we make,” said Murad.

 The International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) is the largest, most representative business organization in the world with hundreds of thousands of member-companies in over 130 nations.

According to Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA), 6.5 million companies from 130 countries are already ICC members.

ICC has three main activities: setting rules of business and trade, dispute resolution, and policy advocacy.

Because its member companies and associations are themselves engaged in international business, ICC has unrivaled authority in making rules that govern the conduct of business across borders. Although these rules are voluntary, they are observed in countless thousands of transactions every day and have become part of international trade.

Business

ICC to Boost Afghan Economy

New office to boost the private sector; attract foreign investment and seek solutions to the problems facing the business community.

Thumbnail

The International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) on Thursday inaugurated its new branch in Afghanistan in an attempt to boost the economic development programs in the country.

Speaking at the inauguration ceremony, CEO Abdullah Abdullah said the purpose of the ICC branch office in Afghanistan was not to rival with other institutions in the country. It was instead a move is to boost the private sector; attract foreign investment and seek solutions to the problems currently facing the business community in Afghanistan.

“We are not satisfied with our performance when it comes in providing facilities to the private sector. We should also facilitate processes within the private sector and the private sector should also work with responsibility and expectations we have,” said Abdullah.

ICC officials have pledged to introduce measures to promote the strategic significance of Afghanistan as a main trade corridor in the region and to further the trade and commercial relations between Afghanistan and the world.

“We want to connect Afghan investors and businessmen to the world business community through ICC in order to pave the way for international investments in Afghanistan,” said Mayel Agha Khairkhaw, chairman ICC in Afghanistan.

On the importance of private sector in the national economic development process, the CEO stated that the government has to do more in providing satisfactory services to the private sector.

 Addressing the audience at the inauguration ceremony, Afghan minister of economy Abdul Sattar Murad said there was a dire need for more solid action to combat corruption in Afghanistan. He warned that no strategy or development program would be fruitful unless corruption in the country is tackled.

“Corruption negates any policy, any law and action we make,” said Murad.

 The International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) is the largest, most representative business organization in the world with hundreds of thousands of member-companies in over 130 nations.

According to Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA), 6.5 million companies from 130 countries are already ICC members.

ICC has three main activities: setting rules of business and trade, dispute resolution, and policy advocacy.

Because its member companies and associations are themselves engaged in international business, ICC has unrivaled authority in making rules that govern the conduct of business across borders. Although these rules are voluntary, they are observed in countless thousands of transactions every day and have become part of international trade.

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