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Food Factory Owner Proud To Produce Domestic Products

A Kabul woman who started a food factory four years ago says she is committed to encouraging the public to buy local products.

Four years ago a Kabul woman started her own home business by preserving fruit and vegetables – a business that today provides work for six other women.

Kubra Dastgerzada said she started out with only 50,000 AFs four years ago and runs her business from her house.

But last year, with the help of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), her company, Farah Farhat Faizi Food Factory, was able to branch out into the instant soup market.

Dastgerzada said she started her business in the hope of promoting domestic products, which could be sold at local markets.

She said she is still not able to draw a salary herself as she is only just covering costs but said if government could help support her, she would be able to increase her turnover.

“We sell our products at the market for what we pay for the ingredients – just so we can compete in the market. If government supports us, then we can make a profit,” said Dastgerzada.

She said the food products she makes carries a certificate of quality but says that the local market does not really buy domestic products.  

Dasgerzada said one retailer who sells her products even suggested she sell her new line of instant soup under the name of a foreign country. However, Dastgerzda said she will not do this.  

The women working in the factory said although unemployment is on the rise, they receive their salaries on time. The women urged government to support entrepreneurs.

“Government should support us and should support such businesses,” Dena Azizi, an employee of the factory said.

Business

Food Factory Owner Proud To Produce Domestic Products

A Kabul woman who started a food factory four years ago says she is committed to encouraging the public to buy local products.

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Four years ago a Kabul woman started her own home business by preserving fruit and vegetables – a business that today provides work for six other women.

Kubra Dastgerzada said she started out with only 50,000 AFs four years ago and runs her business from her house.

But last year, with the help of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), her company, Farah Farhat Faizi Food Factory, was able to branch out into the instant soup market.

Dastgerzada said she started her business in the hope of promoting domestic products, which could be sold at local markets.

She said she is still not able to draw a salary herself as she is only just covering costs but said if government could help support her, she would be able to increase her turnover.

“We sell our products at the market for what we pay for the ingredients – just so we can compete in the market. If government supports us, then we can make a profit,” said Dastgerzada.

She said the food products she makes carries a certificate of quality but says that the local market does not really buy domestic products.  

Dasgerzada said one retailer who sells her products even suggested she sell her new line of instant soup under the name of a foreign country. However, Dastgerzda said she will not do this.  

The women working in the factory said although unemployment is on the rise, they receive their salaries on time. The women urged government to support entrepreneurs.

“Government should support us and should support such businesses,” Dena Azizi, an employee of the factory said.

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