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US Satellite Falls Into Indian Ocean After Launch

US officials did not comment on the loss of the billion-dollar spy satellite manufactured by Northrop Grumman.

A highly classified satellite of the United States launched by SpaceX this week ended up falling into the Indian Ocean, ABC News quoted a US official confirming the report.

The ABC News report said following its launch from Florida's Cape Canaveral Sunday night, the satellite, codenamed Zuma, failed to remain in orbit.

US officials have declined to comment on the loss of the reportedly billion-dollar spy satellite manufactured by Northrop Grumman, the report said.

The ABC News reported that SpaceX suggested that it was not at fault, saying it was a rocket, named Falcon 9, which "did everything correctly."

"The data reviewed so far indicates that no design, operational, or other changes are needed," SpaceX president Gwynne Shotwell said in a statement as quoted in the report.

The Zuma incident would not impact the schedule of SpaceX's upcoming launches, including the maiden flight of Falcon Heavy, the company said as quoted by the ABC News.

Science & Technology

US Satellite Falls Into Indian Ocean After Launch

US officials did not comment on the loss of the billion-dollar spy satellite manufactured by Northrop Grumman.

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A highly classified satellite of the United States launched by SpaceX this week ended up falling into the Indian Ocean, ABC News quoted a US official confirming the report.

The ABC News report said following its launch from Florida's Cape Canaveral Sunday night, the satellite, codenamed Zuma, failed to remain in orbit.

US officials have declined to comment on the loss of the reportedly billion-dollar spy satellite manufactured by Northrop Grumman, the report said.

The ABC News reported that SpaceX suggested that it was not at fault, saying it was a rocket, named Falcon 9, which "did everything correctly."

"The data reviewed so far indicates that no design, operational, or other changes are needed," SpaceX president Gwynne Shotwell said in a statement as quoted in the report.

The Zuma incident would not impact the schedule of SpaceX's upcoming launches, including the maiden flight of Falcon Heavy, the company said as quoted by the ABC News.

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