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Afghanistan

Afghans Sorry To See End Of Three-Day Ceasefire

After government announced an eight-day ceasefire, Taliban last week responded by calling for a three-day truce over Eid. 

For the vast majority of Afghans, who have lived through 17 years of war, the past three days have been a welcome respite from the never ending conflict. 

However, Afghans are concerned that the Taliban will resume the conflict on Monday, as Eid-al-Fitr comes to an end. 

After government announced an eight-day ceasefire, Taliban last week responded by calling for a three-day truce over Eid. 

The ceasefire these past three days has been adhered to by both sides. 

However, some religious scholars have said the resumption of the war in the country has no justification and that the only solution to the ongoing conflict is dialogue. 

Meanwhile, the temporary ceasefire was widely welcomed in Afghanistan and on an international level. The UN, European Union (EU) and the US have all called on the Taliban and the Afghan government to extend the truce. 

The three-day ceasefire also saw hundreds of Taliban fighters descend on cities, towns and villages, where they celebrated Eid alongside security forces and members of the public. 

Some residents in Kabul have complained about this – especially after Taliban fighters flew their flag in the capital.  

“We fear renewed violence between the two sides tomorrow once the ceasefire ends,” said a resident of Kabul, Abdul Ghafor.

“We lose our brothers, our daughters are killed, we are very concerned, we want peace all over Afghanistan,” said another resident Ahmad Zaki.

“Our brothers are being killed and it brings us great pain,” said another Kabul resident, Abdul Hashim.

“Allowing them (Taliban fighters) to come into the city with guns in their hands is an illogical move, the people must know the details of secret peace talks between the Taliban and the government,” said civil society activist, Yasin Negah.

This comes just hours after 15 civilians were killed and 45 others wounded in a suicide bombing in the eastern province of Nangarhar on Sunday afternoon. 

In another Eid explosion, at least 25 people were killed on Saturday evening during Eid celebrations being carried out by civilians, security forces and Taliban – also in Nangarhar. 

Daesh claimed responsibility for Saturday’s explosion. 

In response to the attack, the Taliban said that such attacks will not impact their three-day ceasefire. 

Armed men carrying the Taliban’s white flag in Jalalabad said after the Saturday incident that the enemies of Afghanistan want to sabotage the ceasefire. 

Families of victims meanwhile said their loved ones who had been killed were martyrs of peace. 

Health officials in Nangarhar have said that some of the wounded civilians, from both explosions, were in critical condition. 

Afghanistan

Afghans Sorry To See End Of Three-Day Ceasefire

After government announced an eight-day ceasefire, Taliban last week responded by calling for a three-day truce over Eid. 

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For the vast majority of Afghans, who have lived through 17 years of war, the past three days have been a welcome respite from the never ending conflict. 

However, Afghans are concerned that the Taliban will resume the conflict on Monday, as Eid-al-Fitr comes to an end. 

After government announced an eight-day ceasefire, Taliban last week responded by calling for a three-day truce over Eid. 

The ceasefire these past three days has been adhered to by both sides. 

However, some religious scholars have said the resumption of the war in the country has no justification and that the only solution to the ongoing conflict is dialogue. 

Meanwhile, the temporary ceasefire was widely welcomed in Afghanistan and on an international level. The UN, European Union (EU) and the US have all called on the Taliban and the Afghan government to extend the truce. 

The three-day ceasefire also saw hundreds of Taliban fighters descend on cities, towns and villages, where they celebrated Eid alongside security forces and members of the public. 

Some residents in Kabul have complained about this – especially after Taliban fighters flew their flag in the capital.  

“We fear renewed violence between the two sides tomorrow once the ceasefire ends,” said a resident of Kabul, Abdul Ghafor.

“We lose our brothers, our daughters are killed, we are very concerned, we want peace all over Afghanistan,” said another resident Ahmad Zaki.

“Our brothers are being killed and it brings us great pain,” said another Kabul resident, Abdul Hashim.

“Allowing them (Taliban fighters) to come into the city with guns in their hands is an illogical move, the people must know the details of secret peace talks between the Taliban and the government,” said civil society activist, Yasin Negah.

This comes just hours after 15 civilians were killed and 45 others wounded in a suicide bombing in the eastern province of Nangarhar on Sunday afternoon. 

In another Eid explosion, at least 25 people were killed on Saturday evening during Eid celebrations being carried out by civilians, security forces and Taliban – also in Nangarhar. 

Daesh claimed responsibility for Saturday’s explosion. 

In response to the attack, the Taliban said that such attacks will not impact their three-day ceasefire. 

Armed men carrying the Taliban’s white flag in Jalalabad said after the Saturday incident that the enemies of Afghanistan want to sabotage the ceasefire. 

Families of victims meanwhile said their loved ones who had been killed were martyrs of peace. 

Health officials in Nangarhar have said that some of the wounded civilians, from both explosions, were in critical condition. 

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