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Afghanistan

Dismissed Ministers Continue Their Work

The seven ministers dismissed by the Wolesi Jirga (Lower House of Parliament) early last month for under-spending on their development budget are all still at work – despite MPs’ repeated calls for their removal. 

Government refused to accept the decision and referred the matter to the Supreme Court, which in turn is thought to have upheld the MPs decision last week.  

The Supreme Court has not officially delivered its decision but parliament’s administrative team has said the court has upheld their decision. 

“An MP said that they appreciate the Supreme Court’s decision. This issue is not related to the court and if government asks for the court’s decision, they should respond that the issue is not a matter for the court,” said Nematullah Ghafari, second deputy speaker of parliament.

Some political analysts meanwhile said the decision does not need further interpretation.

“Article 92 of the constitution does not need further interpretation. There is one ambiguity and that is that some of the ministers were not present when dismissed but resolving this ambiguity is easy. People are hoping that parliament, the Supreme Court and government put an end to this issue,” said Moin Marastyal, a political analyst.

“The positions of the dismissed ministers that are working are unknown, because they are neither ministers nor acting ministers. Their position is not specified by government and they are working illegally,” said Abdulwahid Ferozaie, a member of Afghanistan’s Lawyers Union (ALU.)

MPs and critics have however said that government and the Supreme Court have not yet commented on this. They raised the question that if the court upheld the MPs decision, why has government then not introduced acting ministers. 

MPs will break for winter in less than a month and have repeatedly stated they want this issue resolved before this happens. 

Afghanistan

Dismissed Ministers Continue Their Work

Government refused to accept the decision and referred the matter to the Supreme Court, which in turn is thought to have upheld the MPs decision last week.

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The seven ministers dismissed by the Wolesi Jirga (Lower House of Parliament) early last month for under-spending on their development budget are all still at work – despite MPs’ repeated calls for their removal. 

Government refused to accept the decision and referred the matter to the Supreme Court, which in turn is thought to have upheld the MPs decision last week.  

The Supreme Court has not officially delivered its decision but parliament’s administrative team has said the court has upheld their decision. 

“An MP said that they appreciate the Supreme Court’s decision. This issue is not related to the court and if government asks for the court’s decision, they should respond that the issue is not a matter for the court,” said Nematullah Ghafari, second deputy speaker of parliament.

Some political analysts meanwhile said the decision does not need further interpretation.

“Article 92 of the constitution does not need further interpretation. There is one ambiguity and that is that some of the ministers were not present when dismissed but resolving this ambiguity is easy. People are hoping that parliament, the Supreme Court and government put an end to this issue,” said Moin Marastyal, a political analyst.

“The positions of the dismissed ministers that are working are unknown, because they are neither ministers nor acting ministers. Their position is not specified by government and they are working illegally,” said Abdulwahid Ferozaie, a member of Afghanistan’s Lawyers Union (ALU.)

MPs and critics have however said that government and the Supreme Court have not yet commented on this. They raised the question that if the court upheld the MPs decision, why has government then not introduced acting ministers. 

MPs will break for winter in less than a month and have repeatedly stated they want this issue resolved before this happens. 

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