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Afghanistan

Govt’s Ceasefire Ends Amid Heavy Clashes

Kabul’s unilateral ceasefire ended on Friday, but government has not decided on an extension or launch of military operations so far.

The 10-day unilateral ceasefire of the Afghan government with the Taliban ended on Friday but Kabul has not officially commented on a possible extension of the truce. 

The unilateral ceasefire ended amid ongoing movements against government forces by the Taliban in at least 10 provinces including Faryab, Kunduz and Maidan Wardak. 

The Ministry of Defense said government forces will resume their military operations against insurgents in different parts of the country if President Ashraf Ghani does not extend the ceasefire. 

“We are ready to give the required response for all threats and challenges,” the Defense Ministry spokesman Mohammad Radmanish said.

“It depends on decision of Afghan leaders. Any decision by them will be implemented by us,” Interior Ministry spokesman Najib Danish said. 

In the last five days, a big number of residents of northern Faryab province have been protesting in Maimana City, the provincial capital, over an increase in insecurity in the province. 

The residents said they worried that Maimana City will collapse to the Taliban if the situation prevails. 

“Do not sit condition for us. Ensure our security,” a resident of Faryab said. 

“Maimana should be saved from an under-siege situation,” a resident of Faryab said. 

Meanwhile, dozens of Faryab at a gathering in Kabul on Friday said they are concerned about a fragile situation in their province.

“People in Faryab province are fearing entering of the enemy in Maimana City,” Kanishka Turkistani, head of youth affairs of Islamic National Movement of Afghanistan, said. 

“We ask government’s attention to Faryab,” Haji Ahmad Samimi, head of Faryab People’s Council in Kabul, said. 

But why Taliban has expanded their activities in Faryab?

“Ceasefire was violated by the enemy. We had to move towards Maimana City,” said Gen. Amanullah Mobin, Commander of 209 Shaheen Army Corps. 

“There is no sufficient equipment. Vehicles including the armored vehicles are damaged. We called for spare parts many times,” a police officer in Faryab said. 

For the first time, government announced a unilateral ceasefire in June 12 and extended it for another 10 days on June 19.

In an indirect response to government ceasefire, Taliban ordered its fighters not to attack government forces during three days of Eid-al-Fitr. The group continued fighting against government forces after their three-day ceasefire.  

Afghanistan

Govt’s Ceasefire Ends Amid Heavy Clashes

Kabul’s unilateral ceasefire ended on Friday, but government has not decided on an extension or launch of military operations so far.

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The 10-day unilateral ceasefire of the Afghan government with the Taliban ended on Friday but Kabul has not officially commented on a possible extension of the truce. 

The unilateral ceasefire ended amid ongoing movements against government forces by the Taliban in at least 10 provinces including Faryab, Kunduz and Maidan Wardak. 

The Ministry of Defense said government forces will resume their military operations against insurgents in different parts of the country if President Ashraf Ghani does not extend the ceasefire. 

“We are ready to give the required response for all threats and challenges,” the Defense Ministry spokesman Mohammad Radmanish said.

“It depends on decision of Afghan leaders. Any decision by them will be implemented by us,” Interior Ministry spokesman Najib Danish said. 

In the last five days, a big number of residents of northern Faryab province have been protesting in Maimana City, the provincial capital, over an increase in insecurity in the province. 

The residents said they worried that Maimana City will collapse to the Taliban if the situation prevails. 

“Do not sit condition for us. Ensure our security,” a resident of Faryab said. 

“Maimana should be saved from an under-siege situation,” a resident of Faryab said. 

Meanwhile, dozens of Faryab at a gathering in Kabul on Friday said they are concerned about a fragile situation in their province.

“People in Faryab province are fearing entering of the enemy in Maimana City,” Kanishka Turkistani, head of youth affairs of Islamic National Movement of Afghanistan, said. 

“We ask government’s attention to Faryab,” Haji Ahmad Samimi, head of Faryab People’s Council in Kabul, said. 

But why Taliban has expanded their activities in Faryab?

“Ceasefire was violated by the enemy. We had to move towards Maimana City,” said Gen. Amanullah Mobin, Commander of 209 Shaheen Army Corps. 

“There is no sufficient equipment. Vehicles including the armored vehicles are damaged. We called for spare parts many times,” a police officer in Faryab said. 

For the first time, government announced a unilateral ceasefire in June 12 and extended it for another 10 days on June 19.

In an indirect response to government ceasefire, Taliban ordered its fighters not to attack government forces during three days of Eid-al-Fitr. The group continued fighting against government forces after their three-day ceasefire.  

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