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Afghanistan

US President May Pardon Soldiers Accused Of War Crimes: Report

US President Donald Trump has indicated that he is considering pardons for a number of US officers who are accused or convicted of war crimes against civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan, New York Times reported citing two US officials. 

Meanwhile a number of lawmakers in Afghanistan’s parliament said the move would have fallout for the US if Mr. Trump goes with the plan and pardons those American officers accused of war crimes in Afghanistan. 

According to the officials, Trump administration had made expedited requests this week for paperwork needed to pardon the troops on or around Memorial Day.

“I think such statements are completely in contravention of the international laws and international charters and this indicates only a bullying approach,” said MP Ali Akhlaqi. 

“The others are believed to include the case of a former Blackwater security contractor recently found guilty in the deadly 2007 shooting of dozens of unarmed Iraqis; the case of Maj. Mathew L. Golsteyn, the Army Green Beret accused of killing an unarmed Afghan in 2010; and the case of a group of Marine Corps snipers charged with urinating on the corpses of dead Taliban fighters,” the times reported. 

Legal experts in the US have also warned that the move would raise questions on the credibility of US military law and regulations. 

Neither the White House nor the Pentagon have commented on the move so far.

This comes after in March US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that the US will revoke or deny visas to any International Criminal Court (ICC) individuals investigating alleged war crimes by US forces or allies, including in Afghanistan. 

“I’m announcing a policy of US visa restrictions on those individuals directly responsible for any ICC investigation of US personnel,” Pompeo said during a news conference in Washington on March 15.

“But you should know: If you’re responsible for the proposed ICC investigation of U.S. personnel in connection with the situation in Afghanistan, you should not assume you will still have or will get a visa or that you will be permitted to enter the United States,” Pompeo warned.
 

Afghanistan

US President May Pardon Soldiers Accused Of War Crimes: Report

According to the officials, Trump administration had made expedited requests this week for paperwork needed to pardon the troops on or around Memorial Day.

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US President Donald Trump has indicated that he is considering pardons for a number of US officers who are accused or convicted of war crimes against civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan, New York Times reported citing two US officials. 

Meanwhile a number of lawmakers in Afghanistan’s parliament said the move would have fallout for the US if Mr. Trump goes with the plan and pardons those American officers accused of war crimes in Afghanistan. 

According to the officials, Trump administration had made expedited requests this week for paperwork needed to pardon the troops on or around Memorial Day.

“I think such statements are completely in contravention of the international laws and international charters and this indicates only a bullying approach,” said MP Ali Akhlaqi. 

“The others are believed to include the case of a former Blackwater security contractor recently found guilty in the deadly 2007 shooting of dozens of unarmed Iraqis; the case of Maj. Mathew L. Golsteyn, the Army Green Beret accused of killing an unarmed Afghan in 2010; and the case of a group of Marine Corps snipers charged with urinating on the corpses of dead Taliban fighters,” the times reported. 

Legal experts in the US have also warned that the move would raise questions on the credibility of US military law and regulations. 

Neither the White House nor the Pentagon have commented on the move so far.

This comes after in March US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that the US will revoke or deny visas to any International Criminal Court (ICC) individuals investigating alleged war crimes by US forces or allies, including in Afghanistan. 

“I’m announcing a policy of US visa restrictions on those individuals directly responsible for any ICC investigation of US personnel,” Pompeo said during a news conference in Washington on March 15.

“But you should know: If you’re responsible for the proposed ICC investigation of U.S. personnel in connection with the situation in Afghanistan, you should not assume you will still have or will get a visa or that you will be permitted to enter the United States,” Pompeo warned.
 

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