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Pakistan Water Commission Team Leaves For India

Pakistani officials said India violated the Indus Waters Treaty by building reservoirs during a water shortage crisis.

A three-member water commission delegation left for India via Wagah Border on Sunday to inspect hydro-electric projects near Chenab basin.

According to Samaa Digital, the delegation is being led by Pakistan’s commissioner for Indus Waters Syed Mehr Ali Shah.

India has allowed Pakistan to inspect projects after four-and-a-half years, he said while speaking to the media.

“Implementation on the Indus Water Treaty will prove to be beneficial for both Pakistan and India,” he said.

Shah remarked that the treaty doesn’t allow either country to stop the construction of any project.

“We can only raise objections over the design of the project,” he remarked.

He said that Pakistan’s reservations over the design of Baglihar Dam were accepted by India.

Pakistan objected to the construction of Indian water projects on River Chenab. The officials said that India violated the Indus Waters Treaty by constructing reservoirs at a time when there is a severe water shortage in Pakistan.

Prime Minister Imran Khan’s six-month-old Pakistani government has sought to mend ties with India, but this notion has been met with skepticism in New Delhi.

Bloomberg reported recently that all sides see the long-term risks of a conflict over water and that Khan himself is attempting to raise $17 billion for the construction of two large dams, one of which would be built in the disputed territory of Kashmir.

According to the report, in a region that’s home to about a quarter of the world’s population, failure to manage water shortages could be catastrophic.

“Any future war that happens will be on these issues,” Major General Asif Ghafoor, Pakistan’s military spokesman, told reporters last year, referring to water issues. “We need to give it a lot of attention.”

World

Pakistan Water Commission Team Leaves For India

Pakistani officials said India violated the Indus Waters Treaty by building reservoirs during a water shortage crisis.

Thumbnail

A three-member water commission delegation left for India via Wagah Border on Sunday to inspect hydro-electric projects near Chenab basin.

According to Samaa Digital, the delegation is being led by Pakistan’s commissioner for Indus Waters Syed Mehr Ali Shah.

India has allowed Pakistan to inspect projects after four-and-a-half years, he said while speaking to the media.

“Implementation on the Indus Water Treaty will prove to be beneficial for both Pakistan and India,” he said.

Shah remarked that the treaty doesn’t allow either country to stop the construction of any project.

“We can only raise objections over the design of the project,” he remarked.

He said that Pakistan’s reservations over the design of Baglihar Dam were accepted by India.

Pakistan objected to the construction of Indian water projects on River Chenab. The officials said that India violated the Indus Waters Treaty by constructing reservoirs at a time when there is a severe water shortage in Pakistan.

Prime Minister Imran Khan’s six-month-old Pakistani government has sought to mend ties with India, but this notion has been met with skepticism in New Delhi.

Bloomberg reported recently that all sides see the long-term risks of a conflict over water and that Khan himself is attempting to raise $17 billion for the construction of two large dams, one of which would be built in the disputed territory of Kashmir.

According to the report, in a region that’s home to about a quarter of the world’s population, failure to manage water shortages could be catastrophic.

“Any future war that happens will be on these issues,” Major General Asif Ghafoor, Pakistan’s military spokesman, told reporters last year, referring to water issues. “We need to give it a lot of attention.”

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