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Elections 2018

IEC Warns Candidates Against Disrupting Elections

The IECC chief has meanwhile called on government to take tough action against those who are trying to derail the process.

The Chairman of the Independent Election Commission of Afghanistan (IEC) on Wednesday warned candidates who have closed the doors of IEC offices in provinces that they will be disqualified if they continue to disrupt the work of the election commission.

Speaking at a national conference with civil society representatives and political parties, the IEC chief expressed concerns over the ongoing security challenges ahead of the elections and said that neighboring countries, the Taliban and Daesh militant groups including some lawmakers are deliberately disrupting the electoral process.

“The activities which we see indicates that in those provinces where the doors of the election commission were closed, perhaps the elections there will face similar consequences as we saw in Ghazni; the commission is committed to disqualifying those who are involved in such activities,” said Sayyad.

“Those who are sabotaging the process must be identified, the Afghan government shouldn’t remain silent,” said IECC chief Abdul Aziz Aryayee.

Meanwhile, the chairman the Independent Electoral Complaints Commission (IECC) has called on government leadership to take tough action against those who are trying to derail the process.

The IECC chief also accused Afghan political parties of manipulating the election process and said the process shouldn’t be exploited in pursuit of someone’s personal ambitions.

“We are in touch with different companies, but the commission wants its sovereignty to be protected, if God willing, we find a solution to this,” added Sayyad.

“Our proposal is that a trilateral meeting should be convened between representatives of government, the political parties and the company (biometric company),” said Mohammad Natiqi, chairman of the political committee of the political parties and political movements.

In addition, the IEC chief Sayyad also gave the green light for the use of a biometric system on the day of elections.

On Tuesday, a number of Afghanistan’s major political parties and movements accused government of planning “massive fraud and vote rigging” in the upcoming parliamentary elections scheduled for October 20.

The parties also claimed that government wants to ensure its cronies are in parliament.

The political parties threatened to close offices of the Independent Election Commission (IEC) unless their demand for the use of biometric system for the polls was met by the National Unity Government.

“Government is now planning to commit fraud in the elections so that it can send its people to the house of representatives. It wants those representatives in parliament who would serve government so that it can apply its orders in line with its demands,” said Ahmad Zia Massoud, CEO of the Grand National Coalition of Afghanistan, a coalition of over 30 political parties and movements.

Meanwhile, IEC said that the ballot papers have arrived in the country ahead of the elections.

“Ballot papers have been printed and have arrived in Afghanistan,” said IEC commissioner Wasima Badghisi.

Elections 2018

IEC Warns Candidates Against Disrupting Elections

The IECC chief has meanwhile called on government to take tough action against those who are trying to derail the process.

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The Chairman of the Independent Election Commission of Afghanistan (IEC) on Wednesday warned candidates who have closed the doors of IEC offices in provinces that they will be disqualified if they continue to disrupt the work of the election commission.

Speaking at a national conference with civil society representatives and political parties, the IEC chief expressed concerns over the ongoing security challenges ahead of the elections and said that neighboring countries, the Taliban and Daesh militant groups including some lawmakers are deliberately disrupting the electoral process.

“The activities which we see indicates that in those provinces where the doors of the election commission were closed, perhaps the elections there will face similar consequences as we saw in Ghazni; the commission is committed to disqualifying those who are involved in such activities,” said Sayyad.

“Those who are sabotaging the process must be identified, the Afghan government shouldn’t remain silent,” said IECC chief Abdul Aziz Aryayee.

Meanwhile, the chairman the Independent Electoral Complaints Commission (IECC) has called on government leadership to take tough action against those who are trying to derail the process.

The IECC chief also accused Afghan political parties of manipulating the election process and said the process shouldn’t be exploited in pursuit of someone’s personal ambitions.

“We are in touch with different companies, but the commission wants its sovereignty to be protected, if God willing, we find a solution to this,” added Sayyad.

“Our proposal is that a trilateral meeting should be convened between representatives of government, the political parties and the company (biometric company),” said Mohammad Natiqi, chairman of the political committee of the political parties and political movements.

In addition, the IEC chief Sayyad also gave the green light for the use of a biometric system on the day of elections.

On Tuesday, a number of Afghanistan’s major political parties and movements accused government of planning “massive fraud and vote rigging” in the upcoming parliamentary elections scheduled for October 20.

The parties also claimed that government wants to ensure its cronies are in parliament.

The political parties threatened to close offices of the Independent Election Commission (IEC) unless their demand for the use of biometric system for the polls was met by the National Unity Government.

“Government is now planning to commit fraud in the elections so that it can send its people to the house of representatives. It wants those representatives in parliament who would serve government so that it can apply its orders in line with its demands,” said Ahmad Zia Massoud, CEO of the Grand National Coalition of Afghanistan, a coalition of over 30 political parties and movements.

Meanwhile, IEC said that the ballot papers have arrived in the country ahead of the elections.

“Ballot papers have been printed and have arrived in Afghanistan,” said IEC commissioner Wasima Badghisi.

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