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Elections 2019

Ulumi Vows To Crash Possible Poll Riggings

Presidential candidate and Afghanistan’s former minister of interior Gen. Noorul Haq Ulumi, who also leads a newly established political party, Afghanistan People’s National Front (Jabha-e-Milli Mardum-e-Afghanistan), on Tuesday warned to resist any kind of fraud and irregularities in the upcoming presidential elections scheduled for July 20. 
 
The ex-leftist veteran who also served in soviet-backed Najibullah’s government said that he strongly opposes the idea of the establishment of an interim government in Afghanistan, adding that peace with the insurgents should be sealed alongside the present system and in line with the Constitution of Afghanistan and the prevailing laws of the country. 
 
He said that the governments which were ruling the country before the takeover by the Mujahideen weren’t involved in any kind of corruption and those serving in high level government positions were abiding by the laws of the country. 
 
Ulumi said that when he was serving as military commander of the southern provinces, he raised the issue of national reconciliation with the former Mujahideen and always put the peace process in the country on his top working agendas. 
 
“There was trust in our era. We belong to another era where there was no ethnic, racial and religious discrimination. We called each other friends and were witnessing true democracy,” said Ulumi. 
 
Ulumi spent one year in Kabul’s Pul-e-Charkhi jail after he raised his opposition to the policies of former communist president Hafizullah Amin.
 
“We are not opposing the system, we want the Constitution to prevail and respected. Any armed groups that fight government can merge within the framework of this system,” added Ulumi.
 
Ulumi said that he quit his position as minister of interior in the National Unity Government (NUG) under President Ashraf Ghani and Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah over policy issues with the Mujahideen and the technocrats. 
 
He said that NUG leaders were preferring their personal motives rather than working on reforms. 
 
“When I assumed office at the ministry of interior, there was no two teams, two ethnicities or two provinces; everyone was trying to bring their own people,” he said. 
 
Ulumi was born on August 1941 in Kandahar province in the south of Afghanistan. He was graduated from the University of Kabul in 1966. Ulumi was trained for his future military career in both the United States and the former Soviet Union. He was made the new governor of Kandahar by President Najibullah. In 2005, he was a lawmaker from Kandahar and he served as minister of interior for almost one year in 2005.
 
Bashir Ahmad Bezhan, head of Kabul Attendants, a civil society organization, analyst and journalist in profession, and Mohammad Naeem Ghayur are his running mates. 
Bezhan unsuccessfully ran for president in 2009. He also ran for parliamentary elections.
 
On November 2015, lawmakers in Afghanistan‘s Wolesi Jirga (lower house of parliament) refrained from going for a no-confidence motion against Ulumi, who was summoned over the country's deteriorating security situation.
 

Elections 2019

Ulumi Vows To Crash Possible Poll Riggings

Ulumi says he strongly opposes the idea of the establishment of an interim government in Afghanistan. 

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Presidential candidate and Afghanistan’s former minister of interior Gen. Noorul Haq Ulumi, who also leads a newly established political party, Afghanistan People’s National Front (Jabha-e-Milli Mardum-e-Afghanistan), on Tuesday warned to resist any kind of fraud and irregularities in the upcoming presidential elections scheduled for July 20. 
 
The ex-leftist veteran who also served in soviet-backed Najibullah’s government said that he strongly opposes the idea of the establishment of an interim government in Afghanistan, adding that peace with the insurgents should be sealed alongside the present system and in line with the Constitution of Afghanistan and the prevailing laws of the country. 
 
He said that the governments which were ruling the country before the takeover by the Mujahideen weren’t involved in any kind of corruption and those serving in high level government positions were abiding by the laws of the country. 
 
Ulumi said that when he was serving as military commander of the southern provinces, he raised the issue of national reconciliation with the former Mujahideen and always put the peace process in the country on his top working agendas. 
 
“There was trust in our era. We belong to another era where there was no ethnic, racial and religious discrimination. We called each other friends and were witnessing true democracy,” said Ulumi. 
 
Ulumi spent one year in Kabul’s Pul-e-Charkhi jail after he raised his opposition to the policies of former communist president Hafizullah Amin.
 
“We are not opposing the system, we want the Constitution to prevail and respected. Any armed groups that fight government can merge within the framework of this system,” added Ulumi.
 
Ulumi said that he quit his position as minister of interior in the National Unity Government (NUG) under President Ashraf Ghani and Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah over policy issues with the Mujahideen and the technocrats. 
 
He said that NUG leaders were preferring their personal motives rather than working on reforms. 
 
“When I assumed office at the ministry of interior, there was no two teams, two ethnicities or two provinces; everyone was trying to bring their own people,” he said. 
 
Ulumi was born on August 1941 in Kandahar province in the south of Afghanistan. He was graduated from the University of Kabul in 1966. Ulumi was trained for his future military career in both the United States and the former Soviet Union. He was made the new governor of Kandahar by President Najibullah. In 2005, he was a lawmaker from Kandahar and he served as minister of interior for almost one year in 2005.
 
Bashir Ahmad Bezhan, head of Kabul Attendants, a civil society organization, analyst and journalist in profession, and Mohammad Naeem Ghayur are his running mates. 
Bezhan unsuccessfully ran for president in 2009. He also ran for parliamentary elections.
 
On November 2015, lawmakers in Afghanistan‘s Wolesi Jirga (lower house of parliament) refrained from going for a no-confidence motion against Ulumi, who was summoned over the country's deteriorating security situation.
 

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