Latest news
Thumbnail
Science & Technology

Designers Subvert Rules To Create Futuristic Cars

An unusual Los Angeles avant-garde exhibit at a car museum asks visitors to forget everything they know about what they expect automobiles look like.

Vehicles with concealed wheels and counter-intuitive shapes, all shown next to shoes and fashion in a sleek dark environment, are designed to disrupt expectations.

The creators that are doing the disrupting with clean sophisticated and ultra-modern minimalism - Netherlands-born fashion designer Rem D. Koolhaas and American industrial designer Joey Ruiter - are not usually in the business of designing vehicles.

Their interpretations of cars, bicycles, snowmobiles and skateboards have little to do with standard manufacturing methods.

Koolhaas and Ruiter worked independently to conceive their creations, then combined them in a stunning display that is unusual fare not just for visitors, but for the museum as well.

“It is a very unconventional exhibit for us. We typically display automobiles as people expect to see them, but in this case, you’re going to see some automobiles that you probably don’t think are automobiles at all,” Bryan Petersen, the exhibition's director at the Petersen Automotive Museum said.  

One of Koolhaas’ creations is the Lo Res Car Sculpture, which is loosely based on the Lamborghini Countach.

The mirrored car, that looks like something out of a movie, is one of four bespoke doorless vehicles and requires to lift the body from the front for access.

It was sold at auction to a buyer who later donated it to the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation which will now use it to convert it into a full cell technology electric car.

The mirrored Lo Res Car is another creation of Koolhaas, whose company has also created a pair of his shoes for Lady Gaga.

Koolhaas says it is about breaking and ignoring the rules, adding that sometimes we don’t even know the rules, so we don't even know that we're breaking them.

The exhibit also showcases Koolhaas’ stealth sunglasses made of chrome and futuristic shoes by Koolhaas, such as the 'Nova' designed in collaboration with the late architect Zaha Hadid and shoe designs Thorn, X-Ray, and Fang.

Joey Ruiter designed ‘Reboot Buggy’, equipped with a 470-horsepower Chevrolet V-8 and four-wheel independent suspension with speeds above to reach 100 mph.

Ruiter made the car all with salvaged parts, assembled using basic tools and welding and says he drives it but can't get very far as everyone stops him in wonder.

He says their goal is to disrupt the automotive industry and raise questions.

“The exhibit’s called Disruptors. Rem and I both are sort of disrupting the industry from the automotive side. We aren't trained auto designers, but we design other products for lots of people,” he said.  

Ruiter also created The Consumer Car which is supposed to represent a radical rethinking of the economy.

With concealed wheels and matte black exterior, it focuses on the drive as a transformative experience that combines both performance and attitude in a minimalist form.

His Snooped V2 snowmobile is a geometric vehicle that mixes unnatural forms with elements of the tubular lines of fashion.

Ruiter also created the Lo-Rider Skateboard, made of chrome with the handle in the middle. It is meant to be carried like a briefcase, not under the arm anymore.

His Inner-City Bike 36 is a fresh take that reduces the bike to its most basic elements.

With only a seat and two wheels, grips and brake, it is designed for a modern inner city.

The bike offers only what is essential for cutting through short routes in populated spaces.

Tom Stahler, senior editor Vintage Motorsport Magazine, said he “came in with no expectations about the exhibit”, and was immediately “drawn to the four-wheel drive vehicle in the back because there is a lot of great engineering that goes into it.

Disruptors will run through March of 2020.

Science & Technology

Designers Subvert Rules To Create Futuristic Cars

Vehicles with concealed wheels and counter-intuitive shapes are designed to disrupt expectations.

Thumbnail

An unusual Los Angeles avant-garde exhibit at a car museum asks visitors to forget everything they know about what they expect automobiles look like.

Vehicles with concealed wheels and counter-intuitive shapes, all shown next to shoes and fashion in a sleek dark environment, are designed to disrupt expectations.

The creators that are doing the disrupting with clean sophisticated and ultra-modern minimalism - Netherlands-born fashion designer Rem D. Koolhaas and American industrial designer Joey Ruiter - are not usually in the business of designing vehicles.

Their interpretations of cars, bicycles, snowmobiles and skateboards have little to do with standard manufacturing methods.

Koolhaas and Ruiter worked independently to conceive their creations, then combined them in a stunning display that is unusual fare not just for visitors, but for the museum as well.

“It is a very unconventional exhibit for us. We typically display automobiles as people expect to see them, but in this case, you’re going to see some automobiles that you probably don’t think are automobiles at all,” Bryan Petersen, the exhibition's director at the Petersen Automotive Museum said.  

One of Koolhaas’ creations is the Lo Res Car Sculpture, which is loosely based on the Lamborghini Countach.

The mirrored car, that looks like something out of a movie, is one of four bespoke doorless vehicles and requires to lift the body from the front for access.

It was sold at auction to a buyer who later donated it to the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation which will now use it to convert it into a full cell technology electric car.

The mirrored Lo Res Car is another creation of Koolhaas, whose company has also created a pair of his shoes for Lady Gaga.

Koolhaas says it is about breaking and ignoring the rules, adding that sometimes we don’t even know the rules, so we don't even know that we're breaking them.

The exhibit also showcases Koolhaas’ stealth sunglasses made of chrome and futuristic shoes by Koolhaas, such as the 'Nova' designed in collaboration with the late architect Zaha Hadid and shoe designs Thorn, X-Ray, and Fang.

Joey Ruiter designed ‘Reboot Buggy’, equipped with a 470-horsepower Chevrolet V-8 and four-wheel independent suspension with speeds above to reach 100 mph.

Ruiter made the car all with salvaged parts, assembled using basic tools and welding and says he drives it but can't get very far as everyone stops him in wonder.

He says their goal is to disrupt the automotive industry and raise questions.

“The exhibit’s called Disruptors. Rem and I both are sort of disrupting the industry from the automotive side. We aren't trained auto designers, but we design other products for lots of people,” he said.  

Ruiter also created The Consumer Car which is supposed to represent a radical rethinking of the economy.

With concealed wheels and matte black exterior, it focuses on the drive as a transformative experience that combines both performance and attitude in a minimalist form.

His Snooped V2 snowmobile is a geometric vehicle that mixes unnatural forms with elements of the tubular lines of fashion.

Ruiter also created the Lo-Rider Skateboard, made of chrome with the handle in the middle. It is meant to be carried like a briefcase, not under the arm anymore.

His Inner-City Bike 36 is a fresh take that reduces the bike to its most basic elements.

With only a seat and two wheels, grips and brake, it is designed for a modern inner city.

The bike offers only what is essential for cutting through short routes in populated spaces.

Tom Stahler, senior editor Vintage Motorsport Magazine, said he “came in with no expectations about the exhibit”, and was immediately “drawn to the four-wheel drive vehicle in the back because there is a lot of great engineering that goes into it.

Disruptors will run through March of 2020.

Share this post