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Afghanistan

Respiratory Diseases On The Rise Due To Pollution

Health officials say of the 1,000 children who come to Children’s Hospital daily, 30 percent have respiratory diseases. 

Severe air pollution has caused serious respiratory diseases in 30 percent of children who come to the Indira Gandhi Children's Hospital daily, officials said on Tuesday.

Director of the hospital, Noor-ul-haq Yusufzai said air pollution increases in the winter and up to 1,000 children are being referred to the hospital every day. 

Yusufzai said during the winter people use low-quality fuels for warming their houses and the emissions cause various respiratory diseases. 

“Seasonal patients are also increasing. We lay up to six children in a bed that is made for one child,” the head of ICU department of the hospital Mohammad Musa Qane said. 

A Kabul resident, Nargis, on Tuesday had brought her baby to the hospital and said all of her six children have been infected with microbes. 

 “One part of the baby’s lung has been infected with microbes. It is because of the weather and when he breathes the polluted air his illness becomes serious,” said Nargis. 

The National Environmental Protection Agency (NEPA) meanwhile said their recent findings show that the suspended particles have decreased by 500ppm (parts per million) in part of Kabul city, compared to last year. 

“In the last years, there have been a lot of suspended particles in the air. In every cubic meter of air, there were up to 1 500 suspended particles. But our reports show that, based on examinations that were done two days ago, the suspended particles are between 400 and 500 per cubic meter of air,” NEPA deputy head Abdul Wali Modaqiq said. 

NEPA officials said they have many plans on hand to decrease air pollution in Kabul city. In cooperation with Kabul municipality, the NEPA says it has started an assessment on cars and will ban the old cars in the city to prevent air pollution. 

Afghanistan

Respiratory Diseases On The Rise Due To Pollution

Health officials say of the 1,000 children who come to Children’s Hospital daily, 30 percent have respiratory diseases. 

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Severe air pollution has caused serious respiratory diseases in 30 percent of children who come to the Indira Gandhi Children's Hospital daily, officials said on Tuesday.

Director of the hospital, Noor-ul-haq Yusufzai said air pollution increases in the winter and up to 1,000 children are being referred to the hospital every day. 

Yusufzai said during the winter people use low-quality fuels for warming their houses and the emissions cause various respiratory diseases. 

“Seasonal patients are also increasing. We lay up to six children in a bed that is made for one child,” the head of ICU department of the hospital Mohammad Musa Qane said. 

A Kabul resident, Nargis, on Tuesday had brought her baby to the hospital and said all of her six children have been infected with microbes. 

 “One part of the baby’s lung has been infected with microbes. It is because of the weather and when he breathes the polluted air his illness becomes serious,” said Nargis. 

The National Environmental Protection Agency (NEPA) meanwhile said their recent findings show that the suspended particles have decreased by 500ppm (parts per million) in part of Kabul city, compared to last year. 

“In the last years, there have been a lot of suspended particles in the air. In every cubic meter of air, there were up to 1 500 suspended particles. But our reports show that, based on examinations that were done two days ago, the suspended particles are between 400 and 500 per cubic meter of air,” NEPA deputy head Abdul Wali Modaqiq said. 

NEPA officials said they have many plans on hand to decrease air pollution in Kabul city. In cooperation with Kabul municipality, the NEPA says it has started an assessment on cars and will ban the old cars in the city to prevent air pollution. 

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