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Arts & Culture

Hollywood Suffers Worst Summer In 22 Years

Hollywood has suffered its worst summer for at least 22 years with a succession of "half-baked sequels and remakes".

People across the board are complaining about high prices of cinema ticket tickets these days and that movie-goers have said 2017 was a year of bad movies. 

The Los Angeles Times reported that the number of movie tickets sold in the US and Canada is expected to hit 1.26 billion in 2017, which is well below 2016’s 1.31 billion.

It’s the fewest amount of tickets sold in a year since 1995, when Toy Story and Batman Forever were in the lead.

It’s true that there were a few huge breakout successes this year which include Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Wonder Woman, and Girls Trip. But more than a few of this year’s most anticipated movies–including Alien: Covenant and The Mummy slumped, the LA Times reported. 

The last weekend of August was one of the worst weekends. “No need to sugarcoat it, this was a miserable weekend. The combined gross of the top twelve failed to total over $50 million, something that hasn’t happened in an August weekend in over 20 years,” industry watcher Boxofficemojo.com said.

Overall between May to September ticket sales were less than $3.8 billion in total - a 16 per cent decline from last year - according to data from ComScore. It was the first time since 2006 that the industry had not broken the $4 billion mark, according to a Telegram report.

You have to go back to 1995 to find a slower summer, when Apollo 13 and Pocahontas were the big hits. The box office that year registerd around $3.76 billion in ticket sales, accounting for inflation, reports indicated. 

The summer has been packed with big budget, box office flops.

The fifth installments of the Pirates of the Caribbean and Transformers movies tanked in the US - although they both performed strongly elsewhere in the world.

It seems that as ticket prices continue to get higher and higher, the only way to keep people away from streaming services and into a movie theater complex is by giving them original, non-repeated content.

Arts & Culture

Hollywood Suffers Worst Summer In 22 Years

Hollywood has suffered its worst summer for at least 22 years with a succession of "half-baked sequels and remakes".

Thumbnail

People across the board are complaining about high prices of cinema ticket tickets these days and that movie-goers have said 2017 was a year of bad movies. 

The Los Angeles Times reported that the number of movie tickets sold in the US and Canada is expected to hit 1.26 billion in 2017, which is well below 2016’s 1.31 billion.

It’s the fewest amount of tickets sold in a year since 1995, when Toy Story and Batman Forever were in the lead.

It’s true that there were a few huge breakout successes this year which include Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Wonder Woman, and Girls Trip. But more than a few of this year’s most anticipated movies–including Alien: Covenant and The Mummy slumped, the LA Times reported. 

The last weekend of August was one of the worst weekends. “No need to sugarcoat it, this was a miserable weekend. The combined gross of the top twelve failed to total over $50 million, something that hasn’t happened in an August weekend in over 20 years,” industry watcher Boxofficemojo.com said.

Overall between May to September ticket sales were less than $3.8 billion in total - a 16 per cent decline from last year - according to data from ComScore. It was the first time since 2006 that the industry had not broken the $4 billion mark, according to a Telegram report.

You have to go back to 1995 to find a slower summer, when Apollo 13 and Pocahontas were the big hits. The box office that year registerd around $3.76 billion in ticket sales, accounting for inflation, reports indicated. 

The summer has been packed with big budget, box office flops.

The fifth installments of the Pirates of the Caribbean and Transformers movies tanked in the US - although they both performed strongly elsewhere in the world.

It seems that as ticket prices continue to get higher and higher, the only way to keep people away from streaming services and into a movie theater complex is by giving them original, non-repeated content.

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